Category: Teens internet use


I was sickened  after hearing  the story of the 12-year-old New Jersey girl who was murdered by two teenage brothers. I felt I had to take action. Two brothers who are 15 and 17,  murdered a 12-year-old girl in their home. They lured her into their home on the promise of giving her parts for her BMX bike. What I also discovered is that this 12-year-old girl loved her BMX bike so much so that she talked about it on Facebook, and these two freepers read this online , and decided to kill her.

I was so sickened by what these two boys did to this 12-year-old girl, named Autumn Pasquale, that I had to tell you parents how to keep your kids safe:

1. Do not allow your kids to go on Facebook or Twitter until they are 15. No kids younger than 13 should be allowed on Facebook. Kids become obsessed with these social networks, they insult each other , tease, bully. Young children and teens are not equipped with reasoning abilities or the ability to mentally walk away from taunts, threats, and viciousness other kids will do.

2.  Keep your kids safe by monitoring their location all day and night.Check in with your kids periodically. Call your child on her cellphone to find out how she is and where she is. Have your child come home several times a day to have a check in time. Any child under the age of 13 is usually not old enough to know about bad people out there.

3. Tell your kids to NOT go into the homes of strangers. Tell them it is okay to go into a friend’s home. But do not allow them to go into strangers’ homes. Remember stranger danger when you were a kid? Well, teach it to your kids, even if they are older than 13!

4. Have your kids hang out at your house when you are home. Then you will get to meet your kid’s friends. You will discover who they are hanging out with, what your kid’s interests are, and what they do with their friends.

5.  Keep your kids safe by buying them  cellphones, and have them call you every hour if you will be away from home a lot. For working parents, cellphones are a Godsend. I never believed in buying my younger kids cellphones, but cellphones may help save a life, or help the police track where your child is.

6. Tell your kids to always ask you if it is okay to go to someone’s home. Make sure they are always communicating with you. In today’s world of unreality TV, violent video games where people are shot, murdered and the killer keeps going unscathed, it may look cool to kids to do this in real life.

7. Also tell your kids to call you and tell you where they are at all times. I realize you will come off as Big Brother, or a Nutjob parent, but do want your kids to stay alive and safe?

8.Monitor you kids online usage. I know it’s pretty much a joke to monitor your kids online, because there are so many sites, and they outlast you well into the night. But, do try to monitor them. Tell them to go to bed at night. Take away the computer. Set down rules, so they stay safe!

In today’s violent, nasty world, you as a parent must protect your kids. Keep your kids safe, even if it means you become the uncool, pain in the butt parent. You’re better off knowing your kids are safe and okay rather than becoming the next target for some mental patient! Copyright 2012, written by Kate Johns, who has been a professional freelance writer since 2004.

My husband and I were discussing one night how our kids spend most of their time cooped up in their bedrooms. When they do come out, they complain about two things—-how hot it is upstairs, and how there is no food in the house. My husband came up with a great idea to get our kids out of their rooms.

Here it is Moms and Dads— the way to get your kids to come out of their rooms to do something else, such as housework, going outside, making friends, etc—-turn off the electricity to their rooms.

When you think about it, it is a relatively simple concept, turning off the electricity. Unless those fuses supply electricity to an important room such as the kitchen or a living room , then I’d advise you to not click that fuse over to off. And also if you need the electricity to keep a person alive, such as using oxygen, or someone who desperately needs the air conditioning always on—-then don’t mess with the electricity.

When we thought about it, we realized we would  save a lot of money each month if we turned off the electricity to our kid’s rooms. They both have more electronics than I knew existed. They both have computers plugged into the sockets, TV’s, video game players, cellphones, iPods, and Kindles.  I didn’t have my own TV, and cellphone in  my bedroom until I got married, buying them myself!

REALLY? How many electronic toys do you need in one room?

How many things do kids need to have in one space to amuse themselves? What happened to good old-fashioned reading? Reading books is a great way to escape into another word, discovering other worlds. Reading books increasing your vocabulary, helps a person become more social–because you have more to talk about, increasing one’s spelling abilities.

As a parent, you can also turn off the Internet, or the wireless Internet connection, bringing your zombie-like kids out of their bedrooms. They may complain profusely, but tell them it is for their own good.

My husband I have not decided exactly what night, or nights we will turn off the electricity to our kids’ rooms, but we will in an attempt to flush them out of their rooms.

I saw a super funny Facebook message the other day where a parent was making a major statement about kids, and how they act.  It said—-“when my kids get older I’m going to move in with them, sleep till noon, never pick up anything, stay in my room 24-7, not help with any housework, expect maid service,  free Wi-Fi, and cable TV.”

Our children live with us parents until they reach that magical age of maturity when they move out. But sometimes we parents build nests that are too comfortable for our baby birds. Many parents are complaining that their kids will not leave home. Mom and Dad want their independence back, but don’t get it due to the current state of the lousy economy. There are millions of different stories with kids going away to college, coming home, not finding a good job.

All I have to say is when my kids get really great jobs, my expectations are not that lofty. I expect to be treated as fairly as I have treated them. So that means–I don’t have to do any housework. If I am told to do housework, I will complain profusely about said housework, and take an entire day to do one thing. I expect to have all of my food prepared for me, and all of my dishes cleaned by my kids. I expect to have my utility bills paid for, including my car, house insurance, and I’m going to need free Wi-Fi, free cable, air conditioning, heat, a heated pool, and free food.

I might get a job to help out, thus only paying my bills, buying my clothes, eating out, paying for my car including gas, repairs, insurance, etc.

I am not threatening my kids with the things our parents said back in our youth of “I hope your kids turn out just like you someday!” Nope, I’m threatening my kids with—” I’m moving in with you someday and I expect to be treated just like I treated you.”

Does that mean my kids will be yelling at me to go bed before the sun rises, and that I need to get up before noon? Copyright 2012, written by Kate Johns, a professional writer wince 2004.

One of the toughest things a parent faces is sending a child off to college. It’s tough to let your baby walk out of the house, possibly living hundreds, perhaps thousands of miles away from your protective, loving arms. While you may cry, feel depressed, and miss seeing your baby every day, it does get better.

How can you allow your child to go off to college, leaving the nest to lead her own life?

1. You have to allow your child the freedom to start a life of her own. You just have to face it. It’s tough, but mom and dad, you have to allow your child to go on this exciting opportunity.

2. Make some rules for your college age child. In other words, set limits, for your child, so that she will still have boundaries, knowing you still love her. But walk the thin line, mom and dad, set realistic limits.

3. Call or text your child at least once a week. During the first year, she may not want to hear from you at all—loving her new freedom. She may also be horribly homesick and whine everyday. Still you may have the college freshman who is homesick, but never tells you there are any problems. Texting is cooler than calling!!

4. Visit your child at school, and make certain she comes home for the holidays. During a non busy weekend plan to visit her. This way your college child will know you love and support her, but that you are not bugging her.

5. Take action to fill the void of your college age child away at school. Even though you tell yourself you will not miss your baby, you will. Sometimes this is tougher on dads who won’t acknowledge these feelings. Take action now by joining groups, going for walks, starting a new hobby.

6.Change that now empty bedroom into a room you will enjoy such as a hobby room, entertainment room, possibly an office. Either that or close the door until your baby comes back home to visit.

7. Ask your college kid to send pictures via technology—- cellphones,Skype, the Internet, which you are probably paying the bills for anyways. Pics of her dorm room, her friends, herself, pics of her school, etc. Now, you get a glimpse into the exciting life your college child is now leading.

8. Be supportive of your college child who is enjoying her new freedom. She may have left the nest, but you can still love her from afar. Call her, Skype her with the entire family present. If other family members are not present, have other siblings call, text her. Ask Grandparents to call her. Be supportive by listening to her problems and do not complain about your own. Send her care packages, filled with new clothing, cookies.

Remember—- have a good sense of humor parents of college bound kids. You might need it, if you suddenly see your child being roused from a college party on the reality TV show, “Campus Cops.”